The University of Arizona

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Invasive Species Ecology

Annual costs to control invasive plants and animals in the U.S. are difficult to quantify but have been estimated to be in excess of $100 billion. Invasive species have been shown to displace native flora and fauna causing serious economic and ecological problems throughout the world.  Noxious, invasive species are harmful non-native species that are regulated by state and federal laws because they threaten agriculture, navigation, fish, wildlife, or human health on both public and private lands.  Invasive species threaten both urban and rural values because they may: displace native flora and fauna and lessen biological diversity causing serious economic and ecological problems throughout the world, increase erosion and degrade watershed values, eliminate threatened and endangered species, create problems for recreationists, and negatively impact wildlife habitat and other aesthetic qualities of land or water resources.  The study of invasive species and how to control them is a crucial area in natural resources which presents considerable opportunities for students to pursue productive careers in land management.

Faculty involved in this research.