The University of Arizona

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

Seminar Jia Hu

Wednesday, March 25, 2020

INTERPRETING TREE RING RECORDS USING A PLANT

ECOPHYSIOLOGICAL APPROACH

 

SPEAKER: Jia Hu

DATE: Wednesday, March 25, 2020

TIME: 3:00-4:00 pm

LOCATION: online via ZOOM

 

ABSTRACT: Trees rings record a wealth

of information on climate, disturbance, and

forest dynamics, and can record these processes

from the plot to regional scales. However,

extracting plant physiological processes from

the tree ring record has proved to be more

difficult, as integration of leaf to whole tree processes can often lead to confounding

results. My research aims to bring a plant ecophysiological perspective to interpreting

the tree ring isotopic record and to ask, what processes are the rings actually recording?

My research also examines how topography modulates the sensitivity of tree growth and

water acquisition strategies to climate. For example, in temperate forests of the western

U.S., tree growth is often tightly linked to water availability. However, because seasonal

climate patterns are expected to change, tree dependency on different sources of

moisture may also shift (or have already shifted). However, the complexity of the

landscape in montane regions creates micro-habitats that often confound otherwise

predictable relationships at larger spatial scales among elevation, aspect and

hydroclimate. In this talk, I will present several ongoing studies aimed at addressing

these questions, including: 1) Where along the soil depth profile are trees sourcing water

from and have shifts in source water use occurred over the last 100 years? 2) How do

different sources of moisture availability influence forest productivity? and 3) How can

we use oxygen isotopes of tree rings to infer source water and atmospheric aridity

signals?

 

FLYER